Tag Archives: expresiones

Thursday Idiom

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Wear your heart on your sleeve

If a person reveals their emotions easily and doesn’t try to hide them, we say that they wear their heart on their sleeve.

It is thought that the expression possibly originated from the middle ages, when knights would tie a ribbon or cloth around their arm during a jousting match to represent their lady. The first record of the expression, however, is from Shakespeare’s Othello in 1604.

 

Fall head over heels in love (with someone)

This expression can be used when someone falls deeply in love with someone, especially if it happens quickly.

«The moment we met we fell head over heels in love (with each other). We got married the following week!»

IDIOM – YOU CAN LEAD A HORSE TO WATER (BUT YOU CAN’T MAKE IT DRINK)

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This expression is used to say that even if you give someone the opportunity to do something, you can’t force that person to do something they don’t want to do.

«I suggested that she make one of her New Year’s Resolutions to start going to the gym. I even got her a three month membership to the best gym in town, but she still hasn’t started going! Well, you can lead a horse to water… (but you can’t make it drink!)«

IDIOM – YOU CAN’T TEAM AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS

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Last week we talked about New Year’s Resolutions, but by mid January many people are already starting to accept that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.

The idiom you can’t teach an old dog new tricks means that it’s difficult to make someone change the way they do something when they’ve been doing it the same way for a long time. This comes from the idea that puppies are easily trained while older dogs are much more difficult to be trained.

IDIOM – «TO TURN OVER A NEW LEAF»

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A big part of the English language is its many idioms and expressions. A lot of them don’t make sense when you try to translate them, but they some of them can be really fun to learn!


As it’s the start of a new year many people are making their «New Year’s Resolutions». Some popular ones are to ‘go to the gym more’ or ‘eat less junk food’. People do this because they think that the start of a new year is a good time to turn over a new leaf.

The idiom to turn over a new leaf means to make a fresh start, to make a change for the better.

This expression uses the idea of turning to a new, clean page of a book (the ‘leaf’ is a page) and dates back to the early 1500s.


Are you turning over a new leaf this year? What are your New Year’s Resolutions?